Kayak Boston

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Have you ever considered going kayaking in Boston?

Are there many paddlers who kayak Boston and its surrounding waters every year?

Where are some of the best places to paddle in and around Boston?

Boston may not be the first place you think of when you consider kayaking destinations in the United States. However, it’s actually a popular choice, especially among those who want to see some fall foliage during their paddling adventures.

There are a handful of excellent bodies of water you can try kayaking when you visit Boston. Some of these are located in the city itself, but some are located on the outskirts and will require a bit of travel in order to reach them. Keep this in mind when planning your trip.

Read on to learn more about kayaking Boston and everything you need to know about how to plan for this paddling destination.

Option #1. Boston Harbor

Difficulty: Easy
Price: $$
Location: Kendall Square, Cambridge
Duration: Three hours

This is an easy and comfortable paddling experience perfect for the whole family. Paddlers of any skill are sure to enjoy moving down the Boston Harbor and getting a view of some unique landmarks along the way. On this trip, paddlers can see the U.S.S. Constitution in the Charlestown Navy Yard and can catch a glimpse of the Museum of Science, too. With an experienced tour guide, paddlers won’t have to worry about missing out on any of this exciting scenery.

Pros

  • This trip is long enough for kayakers to enjoy themselves and see plenty of sights, but short enough that everyone in the family will be comfortable throughout the trip.
  • Children from ages 8 to 15 are welcome on this tour with at least one adult accompanying them.

Cons

  • Depending on the weather and the group, the tour may not make it to every sightseeing location.
  • At certain times of the year, this tour may become very booked and could be difficult to get into without making reservations several weeks in advance.

Option #2. Charles River

Difficulty: Easy
Price: $$
Location: Cambridge
Duration: Half-day or shorter

Paddle around the gentle Charles River that runs outside Boston and enjoy the sights of the big city! From this trip, you’ll be able to get a great view of the city’s skyline as well as some of the more noticeable buildings that make up the layout, too.

Pros

  • This trip is easy for paddlers of any skill level to enjoy.
  • Even children can enjoy this trip, as long as they are at least eight years old and accompanied by an adult.

Cons

  • At certain times of the year, the Charles River may be very crowded due to tourism.
  • This trip may be shorter and easier than some paddlers would prefer.

Option #3. Hopkinton Reservoir

Difficulty: Easy
Price: $
Location: Hopkinton
Duration: Half-Day or shorter

Anyone who’s looking for a very gentle, calm, and simple place to paddle will enjoy Hopkinton Reservoir. This water is placid and the trip is only about two miles around the whole reservoir. There is also a State Park on-site for more activities when you’re finished paddling, and there are boat rental options at the park as well.

Pros

  • There are several good put-in points for the reservoir that make it easy to access the water, even for complete beginners.
  • There are very small islands in the reservoir that can be explored for a quick additional experience.

Cons

  • This trip may be a bit boring for any more experienced paddlers who want more than just a short outing.
  • At certain times of the year, the water and park both may be very crowded.

Option #4. Mystic River

Difficulty: Easy
Price: $
Location: Medford
Duration: Half-Day

This is town-based river paddling, so it’s a little less off the beaten path than some locations on our list. Located north of Boston, Mystic River is a good way to see some local wildlife without getting completely lost out in nature to do so.

Pros

  • This kayaking trip is easy for beginners to enjoy with or without assistance and features rapids no greater than Class II.
  • There may not be too many people on the river when you visit, since this is a location that is more frequented by locals than anyone else.

Cons

  • There are no official tours available for Mystic River, so you’ll need to be able to kayak on your own in order to tour it.
  • Since it’s near towns, you may have more of an “audience” while kayaking on this river than you might in other more remote locations.

Option #5. Plum Island

Difficulty: Easy
Price: $$
Location: Newburyport
Duration: Half-Day or Full-Day

Spend as little or as much time as you like at Plum Island. This island is peaceful and calm, but features plenty of kayaking opportunities for those who are interested, and is a great way to get your feet wet (literally!) if you’re just learning how to paddle.

Pros

  • This offer is one of the lesser-known kayaking trips in the Boston area, so it may not be as packed during the peak season as others.
  • Paddlers can easily enjoy exploring Plum Island after their kayaking trip.

Cons

  • Most touring companies for this area charge the same amount for bringing your own kayak as they charge for renting one of theirs, making it unnecessary and inconvenient to bring your own.
  • There are sunset tours available only for a couple of months during the summer.

Conclusion

There’s so much to learn about where and how to go kayaking in and around the Boston area! It’s a good idea to narrow down your location options based on a few places you’d like to visit the most, and then plan your trip from there. You can always keep the other choices as backups in case anything prevents you from visiting the rivers you want to check out the most.

But when is the best time of year to kayak in Boston? Are there any reasons why you might want to consider coming during the off-season instead?

Fall is, by far, the best time of year to go kayaking in Boston and the surrounding areas. At this time, the water is still warm enough from the summer that you won’t get too cold while experiencing it, but the cooling weather makes kayaking more comfortable. Best of all, the scenery is impressive in the fall, showcasing all the autumn colors of New England as you paddle along the body of water you choose.

There are, of course, some reasons why you might not want to visit during peak season. For example, it is going to be colder in the fall in Boston than it would be during the summer, so if you’re looking for a warm-weather kayaking experience, plan to come earlier in the year.

Peak season is also the time of year when tourists visit New England the most often, so you’ll need to expect larger crowds and possibly more expensive prices throughout the city, as well.

There are some compelling reasons to visit Boston during the off-season, but if you’re looking for the quintessential kayaking experience, fall is still your best choice. Keep this in mind as you move forward and plan your upcoming trip kayaking the waters of Boston.

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